WELCOME

Welcome to Boulangerie 2017/2018!
Our concert series combines concert and salon together and builds a bridge between the traditional chamber music repertoire and the music of today. Each event is dedicated to a contemporary composer who is present during the concert and talks with us about his work and life – the focus here is not musicological analysis, but a personal conversation about the music. To conclude the evening, bread and wine is offered after in a relaxed atmosphere and the audience has the opportunity to talk with us and our guest.

We hope welcoming you to our next Boulangerie!

Karla, Birgit & Ilona
Boulanger Trio

2017 – 2018 SEASON

Thursday, 26 October 2017, 7 pm
Hamburg, resonanzraum St. Pauli

Boulangerie with Charlotte Bray

Ludwig van Beethoven, Trio movement in B flat major WoO 39
Charlotte Bray, Beyond for solo violin (2013)
Trio in G major op. 121a, “Kakadu Variations”
Charlotte Bray, Those Secret Eyes (2014) for violin, cello and piano
Charlotte Bray, Perseus (2015) for cello and piano
Charlotte Bray, That Crazed Smile (2014) for violin, cello and piano
Boulanger Trio
Guest: Charlotte Bray

Charlotte Bray

Sunday, 29 October 2017, 7 pm
Berlin, Radialsystem V

Boulangerie with Charlotte Bray

Ludwig van Beethoven, Trio movement in B flat major WoO 39
Charlotte Bray, Beyond for solo violin (2013)
Trio in G major op. 121a, “Kakadu Variations”
Charlotte Bray, Those Secret Eyes (2014) for violin, cello and piano
Charlotte Bray, Perseus (2015) for cello and piano
Charlotte Bray, That Crazed Smile (2014) for violin, cello and piano
Boulanger Trio
Guest: Charlotte Bray

Charlotte Bray

An outstanding talent of her generation, the composer Charlotte Bray studied under Mark Anthony Turnage and Joe Cutler. She has written for leading musicians, including Lawrence Power and Roderick Williams. Her associations include the London Symphony Orchestra, London Philharmonic Orchestra and Birmingham Contemporary Music Group and her work has featured at the BBC Proms, Aldeburgh, Tanglewood, Aix-en-Provence and Verbier. Sir Mark Elder, Oliver Knussen and Daniel Harding are among the renowned conductors who have performed her work.

2017 premieres include Voyage by The Nordic Saxophone Quartet (Torún, Poland); piano quartet Zustände by The Schubert Ensemble (Straford-on-Avon); and Blaze and Fall, a Hommage to Kurtag, by the Jacquin Trio. Also, performances of At the Speed of Stillness by the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra in the ISCM World Music Days Festival; and Black Rainbow by the DalaSinfonietta and Wermland Opera Orchestra (Falun and Karlstad, Sweden). Collaborating with the BBC Symphony Orchestra on two occasions in 2016, Stone Dancer premiered at Aldeburgh Festival under Oliver Knussen; and her cello concerto Falling in the Fire under Sakari Oramo with Guy Johnston in the BBC Proms. Exploring the work of the late Tim Hetherington, a renowned photo journalist, the latter is motivated by the composer’s endeavour to comprehend war and its impact in our world today. Other recent highlights include: Bluer than Midnight (Winsor Music, Boston); chamber opera Entanglement, in collaboration with librettist Amy Rosenthal (Cheltenham and Presteigne Festivals, Nova Music Opera); and a stage work Out of the Ruins (Royal Opera House Covent Garden).

At the Speed of Stillness, Charlotte’s debut recording on NMC Records, was released in October 2014.


Her many accolades include the Royal Philharmonic Society Composition Prize; Lili Boulanger Prize; Critics’ Circle Award; Composer-in-residence with BCMG, Oxford Lieder Festival and Hatfield House Chamber Music Festival; named in The Evening Standard’s Most Influential Londoners (2011); Honorary Member of Birmingham Conservatoire and named Alumni of the Year (2014); interviewed for Radio 3’s Composers’ Room series; residencies at the MacDowell Colony, the Liguria Study Centre and Aldeburgh Music.

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Those Secret Eyes

Those Secret Eyes is loosely inspired by Shakespeare’s Macbeth, and principally the plays’ female characters: Lady Macbeth and the Witches. Set at night, it holds dark undercurrents of suspicion, sin, superstition, and mistrust. Governed by the principal themes of appearance and reality, and ambition and guilt, the piece is driven by a cruel, dry energy.


The scheming, tightly wound opening, strings playing single sul ponticello lines punctuated by the piano, seems as if they are conspiring together and daring each other. The plot thickens with the music becoming faster, more excitable and heavier. Even the melodic lines before the climax are unsettlingly cold and calculated. We wind up back to similar material seen at the opening, as if this short meeting has come to a close, veiled agenda set.

Beyond

Written in Berlin in the early summer of 2013 as a gift for a friend on his departure and return to his homeland of Israel. An impassioned melody flows freely and sweetly. I wanted to principally explore the dark lower register of the instrument, as well as the special sound quality found high on each string. Long questioning phrases hang in the air, yet a sense of closure is finally reached.

Perseus

Dedicated to Guy Johnston and Tom Poster


Guy Johnston commissioned this piece to commemorate the 300th anniversary of his cello, with the idea that the piece would reflect in some way the history of the instrument. The composer took the cello makers name, David Tecchler, and translated this letters into a musical language to form the backbone of the work harmonically. The harmonic structure of the first main section (after the introduction), for example, follows the letters of his name : D-A-v-i-D t-E-C-C-H(B)-l-E-r, (ignoring the small letters which don’t literally translate into notes).

The work also takes inspiration from the phenomenon known as a ‘Super Massive Black Hole’. Captivating images have recently revealed that the Black Hole in the centre of the ‘Perseus’ galaxy, a constellation in the Northern hemisphere, dominates everything around it by propelling an extraordinary amount of radiation and energy out into the surrounding gas. The strange paradox is that an explosive feeding Black Hole is the brightest source of life in the galaxy, greedy and luminous. Bray is fascinated and motivated creatively by this unseen and unknowable force. Exploring various imaginary states, this abstract source found its way into the piece.

The introduction contains three contrasting short musical kernels, each of which are explored and expanded upon in the main body of the piece. The cello line is underpinned by a low piano drone, and (in the second and third phrases), a high accented chord. This flows into a delicate section, sparsely written, as if the notes are distant stars in the galaxy far away. Growing out of this, the composer describes the section following as ‘White Heat, luminous’. An intense rhythmic and repetitive bass line thunders away, punctuated by high stabbing clusters. The sustained glowing cello line leads to fast outbursts. A high cello melody sings throughout the third section, the lyrical centre of the piece. It feels intense and gritty above the powerful chordal piano accompaniment. The forth and final section is deeply calm, a slow reflective end to the piece.

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Tuesday, 5 December 2017, 7 pm
Hamburg, resonanzraum St. Pauli

Boulangerie with Toshio Hosokawa

Toshio Hosokawa, Small Chant (2012) for cello
Camille Saint-Saëns, Trio in e minor op. 92
Toshio Hosokawa, Trio (2013)
Boulanger Trio
Guest: Toshio Hosokawa

Toshio Hosokawa

Wednesday, 6 December 2017, 8 pm
Berlin, Radialsystem V

Boulangerie with Toshio Hosokawa

Toshio Hosokawa, Small Chant (2012) for cello
Camille Saint-Saëns, Trio in e minor op. 92
Toshio Hosokawa, Trio (2013)
Boulanger Trio
Guest: Toshio Hosokawa

Toshio Hosokawa

“Music is the place where notes and silence meet.”(Toshio Hosokawa)

Toshio Hosokawa, Japan’s pre-eminent living composer, creates his distinctive musical language from the fascinating relationship between western avant-garde art and traditional Japanese culture. His music is strongly connected to the aesthetic and spiritual roots of the Japanese arts (e.g. calligraphy), as well as to those of Japanese court music (e.g. Gagaku) and he gives musical expression to the notion of a beauty that has grown from transience: “We hear the individual notes and appreciate at the same time the process of how the notes are born and die: a sound landscape of continual ‘becoming’ that is animated in itself.”

Born in Hiroshima in 1955, Toshio Hosokawa came to Germany in 1976 where he studied composition with Isang Yun, Brian Ferneyhough and later Klaus Huber. Although he initially based his music on the western avant-garde, he gradually developed a new musical world between East and West. He first gained widespread recognition with the 2001 world premiere of his oratorio Voiceless Voice in Hiroshima.

In the last few years, Toshio Hosokawa has written numerous orchestral works, including Nach dem Sturm for two sopranos and orchestra, commissioned to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Tokyo Metropolitan Symphony Orchestra, and the Roche Commission Woven Dreams (Cleveland Orchestra under Franz Welser-Möst, Lucerne Festival). Circulating Ocean, which was premiered by the Vienna Philharmonic in 2005 at the Salzburg Festival, has meanwhile become part of the standard repertoire of many orchestras. In 2013 Toshio Hosokawa returned to Salzburg with Klage for soprano and orchestra based on a text by Georg Trakl (NHK Symphony Orchestra under Charles Dutoit, soprano: Anna Prohaska). The organ concerto Umarmung, premiered last season by Christian Schmitt and the Bamberg Symphony, will find a repeat performance in February at the Wiener Konzerthaus with the Vienna Radio Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Cornelius Meister.

In December the Ensemble Intercontemporain will give the world premiere of a new melodrama with soprano Kerstin Avemo and Nô actress Ryoko Aoki. The libretto, written by Oriza Hirata, is based on a traditional tale from Nô theatre. The playwright previously wrote the libretto for Toshio Hosokawa’s opera Stilles Meer, which indirectly addressed the nuclear catastrophe at Fukushima. Premiered at the Hamburg State Opera in 2016, the work will be re-staged this season. A further new opera, dealing with Heinrich von Kleist’s novella The Earthquake in Chile, will be premiered at the end of the current season at the Stuttgart Opera.

Many of Toshio Hosokawa’s earlier music theatre works have become part of the repertoire of large opera houses. His first opera Vision of Lear garnered critical acclaim at the Munich Biennale in 1998 and his 2004 work Hanjo, staged by the choreographer Anna Teresa de Keersmaeker and co-commissioned by Brussels’ La Monnaie and the Festival Aix-en-Provence, has been seen on numerous stages since its premiere. Like Hanjo, Matsukaze is also based on material from the Japanese noh theatre tradition. The opera was first performed in 2011 in a production by the choreographer Sasha Waltz at La Monnaie and subsequently at the Berlin State Opera, in Warsaw and in Luxembourg. Staged performances of the monodrama The Raven for mezzo-soprano and ensemble, which received its world premiere in Brussels in 2012, have also taken place.

Toshio Hosokawa continues to compose works that focus on nature themes such as the horn concerto Moment of Blossoming for Stefan Dohr and the Berlin Philharmonic (2011). In some of these works he combines Japanese and European instruments for example in Voyages X Nozarashi for shakuhachi and ensemble. Traditional Japanese instruments such as the shō or koto also feature elsewhere in his oeuvre, which comprises approx. 130 works.

Toshio Hosokawa has received numerous awards and prizes. He has been a member of the Academy of Fine Arts Berlin since 2001 and a fellow of the Institute for Advanced Study in Berlin since 2006. In 2013/14 he was composer-in-residence at Netherlands Philharmonic Orchestra. He is the Artistic Director of the Takefu International Music Festival and Suntory Hall International Program for Music Composition.

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Trio for violin, violoncello and piano
This piece is concerned with the world of shaman, which I have been very interested in lately. A shaman is a person who creates a path connecting this world and the underworld. In this trio, the violin represents female, and the cello male. The instruments sing a duo as an extension of the voices of two shamans. The piano is the cosmos and the nature. Violin and piano have a ‘Yin and Yang’ relationship, the creation principal of the Taoism cosmos: polar opposites which compliment one another without cancelling each other out, creating perfect harmony. Toshio Hosokawa

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Saturday, 27 January 2018, 8 pm
Vienna, Musikverein

Boulangerie with Beat Furrer

Beat Furrer, Studie for piano (2011)
Franz Schubert, Trio in E flat major D 929
Beat Furrer, Lied for violin and piano (1993)
Beat Furrer, Retour an Dich for violin, cello and piano (1984)
Boulanger Trio
Guest: Beat Furrer
hosted by Felber-Agentur für Kultur and the Alban Berg Stiftung

foto_dimitri_papageorgiou.tif

Wednesday, 14 February 2018, 7 pm
Hamburg, Elbphilharmonie

Boulangerie with Beat Furrer

Beat Furrer, Studie for piano (2011)
Franz Schubert, Trio in E flat major D 929
Beat Furrer, Lied for violin and piano (1993)
Beat Furrer, Retour an Dich for violin, cello and piano (1984)
Boulanger Trio
Guest: Beat Furrer

Friday, 16 February 2018, 7 pm
Berlin, Radialsystem V

Boulangerie with Beat Furrer

Beat Furrer, Lied for violin and piano (1993)
Franz Schubert, Trio in E flat major D 929
Beat Furrer, Studie for piano (2011)
Beat Furrer, Retour an Dich for violin, cello and piano (1984)
Boulanger Trio

TICKETS HAMBURG
TICKETS BERLIN

Saturday, 14 April 2018, 12 pm
Hamburg, Elbphilharmonie

Boulangerie with Jorge E. López

Joseph Haydn, trio in E flat major Hob XV:29
Jorge E. López, Trio op. 22
Dmitri Schostakowitsch, trio in e minor op. 67
Boulanger Trio
Guest: Jorge E. López

lopez-2

Sunday, 22 April 2018, 8 pm
Vienna, Musikverein

Boulangerie with Jorge E. López

Joseph Haydn, trio in E flat major Hob XV:29
Jorge E. López, Trio op. 22
Dmitri Schostakowitsch, trio in e minor op. 67
Boulanger Trio
Guest: Jorge E. López
hosted by Felber-Agentur für Kultur and the Alban Berg Stiftung

Thursday, 26 April 2018, 7 pm
Berlin, Konzerthaus

Boulangerie with Jorge E. López

Joseph Haydn, trio in E flat major Hob XV:29
Jorge E. López, Trio op. 22
Dmitri Schostakowitsch, trio in e minor op. 67
Boulanger Trio
Guest: Jorge E. López

Sunday, 13 May 2018, 5 pm
Fulda

Boulangerie with Pēteris Vasks

Pēteris Vasks, Episodi e canto perpetuo (1985)
Olivier Messiaen, Quatuor pour la fin du temps
Boulanger Trio
Guests: Pēteris Vasks, Sebastian Manz (clarinet)
hosted by the city of Fulda

Peteris Vasks

Friday, 8 June 2018, 8 pm
Donaueschingen

Boulangerie with David Philip Hefti

Franz Schubert, Adagio in E-flat major „Notturno“
David Philip Hefti, Lichter Hall (2012)
David Philip Hefti, Poème noctambule (2016)
Arnold Schönberg, Verklärte Nacht op.4 (Arr. Eduard Steuermann)
Boulanger Trio
Guest: David Philip Hefti

hefti_q
David Philip Hefti

Despite his classically avant-garde musical language, Hefti’s prime concern is expressiveness – addressing his listener with a candid eloquence. He loves powerful contrasts and does not refrain from writing intense cantilenas. His music is capable of cumulative processes of concentration, and can unleash a vehement drive.
(Süddeutsche Zeitung)

David Philip Hefti was born in Switzerland in 1975. He studied composition, conducting, clarinet and chamber music at the music academies of Zurich and Karlsruhe, where his teachers included Cristóbal Halffter, Rudolf Kelterborn, Wolfgang Meyer, Wolfgang Rihm and Elmar Schmid. He works today as a composer and conductor, and is resident in Mannheim and Zurich.

Hefti’s oeuvre encompasses some 60 works, including orchestral, vocal and chamber music. He has composed large-scale orchestral works, solo concertos, works for chamber orchestra, string quartets, solo pieces, song cycles and an opera. He is currently completing his symphony Beziehungsweisen (“Interplays of relationships”), of which three movements have already been performed. Hefti has enjoyed a working relationship of several years’ standing with artists such as Viviane Hagner, Christian Poltéra, Hartmut Rohde, Baiba Skride, Jan Vogler and Antje Weithaas, who all regularly perform his music.

Hefti has worked with numerous orchestras and ensembles including the Zurich Tonhalle Orchestra, the Bavarian State Orchestra, the Symphony Orchestra of Bavarian Radio, the Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin, the Orchestre symphonique de Montréal, the Tokyo Sinfonietta, the Ensemble Modern, the Amaryllis Quartet and the Leipzig String Quartet. His orchestral works have been performed by conductors such as Peter Eötvös, Cornelius Meister, Kent Nagano, Jonathan Nott, Michael Sanderling, Mario Venzago and David Zinman. He has been invited to music festivals such as Wien Modern, Beijing Modern, Ultraschall Berlin, the Lucerne Festival, the Gstaad Menuhin Festival, the Schleswig-Holstein Music Festival, Heidelberger Frühling, the Pablo Casals Festival in Prades, the Dvorak Festival in Prague and the Suntory Festival in Tokyo.

In 2013, Hefti was awarded the Composer Prize of the Ernst von Siemens Music Foundation and in 2015 the Hindemith Prize of the Schleswig-Holstein Music Festival. He has also won the International Composition Competition of the Pablo Casals Festival in Prades, the George Enescu International Competition for Composition in Bucharest and the International Gustav Mahler Composition Prize. Hefti’s works are published by Edition Kunzelmann and Edition C. F. Peters and have been recorded for CD by various labels. When his CD Changements was released, the Neue Zürcher Zeitung praised his “excellent mastery of the orchestral apparatus, both as composer and as conductor”.

In May 2017, Hefti’s first opera, Annas Maske, was given its world première at the St. Gallen Theatre. It is based on the true story of the Swiss singer Anna Sutter, whose life tragically mirrored the fate of her own star role, that of Carmen: her former lover, the conductor Aloys Obrist, murdered her in 1910 in Stuttgart. David Philip Hefti’s musical language, which is characterised by transparency, a chamber-music intensity and a concentrated sense of dramaturgy, is also manifested in this, his first opera. The Neue Zürcher Zeitung wrote as follows: Anna’s Mask: Luminous ecstasy – and this is the point of it – is no betrayal of Hefti’s aesthetic stance, which otherwise tends to fragile, pointillist drops of sound solidifying into chordal structures.

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The duo Poème noctambule is characterised by two contradictory processes. The work begins extremely quietly, as if in the distance. Its sounds become ever more concrete and ultimately blossom out so that the dynamic and expressive climax is reached at the end of the piece. With regard to tempo, a contrary development takes place in which the quick opening tempo slows down continually until it almost reaches a point of stasis towards the close of the work. In Poème noctambule, the compositional means have been reduced inasmuch as it dispenses with the expanded performance techniques on the violin and inside the piano that I have used in my previous works. But the utilisation of all three pedals on the piano and the use of metal and ‘normal’ mutes on the violin, in combination with an expansion of the harmony to incorporate micro-intervals, nevertheless allows for a complex palette of sound colours.

My first piano trio, Schattenspie(ge)l from 2006, is an expansive, multi-movement work, and I have composed my second trio as a compact, one-movement, ‘bright’ pendant to it. Various impulses draw points of calm in their wake – as if they were echoes – and they develop constantly from an initial hesitance to a flowing motion. The ensuing cantabile passage, which is an echo of my orchestral work Moments lucides, dissolves into a shadowy close.

D. P. H.

Friday, 29 June 2018, 8 pm
Vienna, Musikverein

Boulangerie with Olga Neuwirth

Olga Neuwirth, Marsyas for piano (2005)
Ernest Bloch, Three Nocturnes (1924)
Olga Neuwirth, weariness heals wounds I for cello solo
Edvard Grieg, Andante con moto in c minor
Olga Neuwirth, Quasare/Pulsare II for violin, cello and piano (2016)
Boulanger Trio
Guest: Olga Neuwirth
hosted by Felber-Agentur für Kultur and the Alban Berg Stiftung

neuwirth_q
Olga Neuwirth

Olga Neuwirth was born in Graz, Austria, in 1968.

She studied at the Academy of Music in Vienna and the San Francisco Conservatory of Music. During her stay in the States she also attended the San Francisco Art College, where she studied painting and film. Her private teachers in composition included Adriana Hölszky, Tristan Murail and Luigi Nono. She first burst onto the international scene in 1991, at the age of 22, when two of her mini-operas were performed at the Wiener Festwochen. Ever since her works have been presented worldwide.

In 1998 she was featured in two portrait concerts at the Salzburg Festival within the framework of the Next Generation series. The following year, her music theatre work Bählamms Fest, with a libretto by Elfriede Jelinek after a play by Leonora Carrington in a set-design by the Brothers Quay, premiered at the Wiener Festwochen and won the Ernst Krenek prize. A year later, she wrote Clinamen/Nodus for Pierre Boulez and the London Symphony Orchestra.

In 2002 Olga was appointed composer-in-residence at the Lucerne Festival and let
her music be remixed by DJ Spooky, which was not common at all in the so called “Classical New Music”-Scene at that time.

With Nobel Prize winning novelist Elfriede Jelinek she has created two radio plays and three operas.
Neuwirth has often been inspired by Anglo-American culture. For instance, her music theater “Lost Highway”, which had its world premiere in 2003, was based on David Lynch’s film of the same name and won a South Bank Show Award for the production presented by English National Opera at the Young Vic in 2008.

Olga Neuwirth’s works explores a wide range of forms and genres and are multi-layered and rich of colours. In many of her works since the early 1990s, she fused live-musicians, electronics and video into genre-crossing audio-visual experiences.

Since Olga Neuwirth was a teenager, she has also been interested in film, literature, science, architecture and the visual arts. Aside from composing, and cause of this wide interests she has also realised sound installations, art exhibitions and short films; one of her multi-media installations was presented at the documenta 12 in Kassel in 2007. Also a prolific writer, her diary of living in Venice/Italy was published in 2003 and a selection of her essays were published in 2008.

She has also collaborated in the experimental jazz/improvisation world with Robyn Schulkowsky (f.e. a collaborative work for the opening of “Graz, cultural capitol of Europe 2003”), David Moss and Burkhard Stangl.

Aside from her operas, Olga Neuwirth’s most notable works include the ensemble piece with live-electronics “Construction in space”, the piano concerto ‘locus….doublure…solus…’ and the trumpet concerto ‘…miramondo multiplo…”.

Several recordings of her music have been released on the labels Kairos and col legno.

Beside having received numerous prizes, in 2010 she was awarded, as the first woman in Austria ever in the category of music, the “Austrian State Prize”. She is member of the “Akademie der Künste” in Berlin and Munich.

Olga Neuwirth lived in San Francisco, New York, Prague, Paris, Venice, Trieste, Vienna and Berlin.

In 2012 Olga Neuwirth completed two new operas while living in NYC: ‘The Outcast’ on Herman Melville, and ‘American Lulu’, a re-interpretation of Alban Berg’s ‘Lulu’ which was also presented in a new production in Bregenz, Edinburgh and London in August/September 2013.

Masaot/Clocks without Hands, written for the Vienna Philharmonic, received its premiere in Cologne in may 2015 under the baton of Daniel Harding. It was also performed in Vienna and Luxembourg and in february 2016 at Carnegie Hall under the baton of Valerij Gergiev.

Le Encantadas o le avventure nel mare delle meraviglie for 6 ensembles and (live)electronics which is co-commissioned by Ensemble Intercontemporain, Cité de la musique, Festival d’Automne à Paris, Donaueschinger Musiktage, IRCAM, Lucerne Festival and Wiener Konzerthaus was premiere in fall 2015 and will be heard at Holland Festival and Lucerne Festival in summer 2016.

Neuwirth is composer-in-residence at the Lucerne Festival 2016.

Her percussion concerto (Roche-Comission), written for Martin Grubinger, will premiere at the Lucerne Festival 2016 under the baton of Susanna Mälkki.

We thank our sponsors:

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Rondo, Ausgabe 2/2018

Boulanger Trio: Brückenschläge

Ein Artikel von Guido Fischer

Im Klassikbetrieb machen sich Konzerthausmanager, Soziologen und Pädagogen am laufenden Band Gedanken darüber, mit welchen Strategien und Events man gerade jüngeres Publikum „abholen“ kann. Noch komplizierter wird es, wenn zeitgenössische Musik ins Spiel kommt. Da gehen bei vielen immer noch reflexartig die Klappen runter. Seit 2012 schaffen es diese drei Musikerinnen aber tatsächlich, die Neugier für avancierte Klänge derart zu wecken, dass ihre etwas anderen Salon-Konzerte regelmäßig blendend besucht und oftmals ausverkauft sind. „Boulangerie“ haben die drei Damen des Hamburger Boulanger Trio ihre Konzertreihe getauft.

Und das Erfolgskonzept ist im Grunde denkbar einfach. Für jede „Boulangerie“ wird ein zumeist namhafter Komponist eingeladen, mit dem man sich über seine Arbeit und nicht zuletzt über ein von ihm mitgebrachtes Stück unterhält. Und weil das Boulanger Trio stets den Bogen von der Tradition in die Gegenwart schlagen will, lädt das Ensemble seinen Gast zudem ein, sich ein oder zwei Werke aus dem riesigen Klaviertrio-Repertoire auszusuchen. Auf Wunsch etwa des in Kuba geborenen Komponisten Jorge E. López, der in der April-„Boulangerie“ im Mittelpunkt stehen wird, stellt das Boulanger Trio dem López-Opus jeweils ein Klaviertrio von Haydn und Schostakowitsch zur Seite.

Auch über eine solche Konzertdramaturgie gelingt es dem Boulanger Trio, die berühmtberüchtigten Berührungsängste vor musikalisch scheinbar allzu Sperrigem abzubauen. „Wir hatten ein geselliges Konzertformat im Sinn, bei dem es gerade durch die persönliche Begegnung mit einem Komponisten auch zu einem lebendigen Austausch mit dem Publikum kommen soll“, so Cellistin Ilona Kindt. Vorbild für dieses Konzertformat war ein Musiksalon, den die berühmte Namenspatronin des Trios, die französische Komponistin und Lehrerin Nadia Boulanger, ab den 1920er Jahren in Paris jeden Mittwoch veranstaltete.

Schon längst zieht die „Boulangerie“ aber nicht nur in Hamburg und Berlin mittlerweile ein Stammpublikum an, sondern seit einiger Zeit auch im Wiener Musikverein. Und die Liste der eingeladenen Komponisten liest sich durchaus wie ein Who´s Who der Neuen Musik. So waren Toshio Hosokawa, Johannes Maria Staud, Kaija Saariaho sowie der österreichische Altmeister Friedrich Cerha bereits zu Gast.

Nun also trifft man auch in Wien (22. April) auf Jorge E. López, der einer der interessantesten Komponisten der Gegenwart ist. Die Werke des in Kalifornien ausgebildeten und seit 1991 in Oberkärnten lebenden Musikers werden auf großen Festivals wie den Donaueschinger Musiktagen und den Salzburger Festspielen aufgeführt und wurden vielfach ausgezeichnet. Und der das Boulanger Trio ungemein bewundernde Wolfgang Rihm meinte einmal über seinen Komponistenkollegen: „Wenn der Begriff des Originellen – ja sogar des Originals – noch etwas bedeutet, dann wird er von Jorge E. López verkörpert.“ Ein eigenes (Klang-)Bild kann man sich nun bei der kommenden „Boulangerie“ machen. Und wer nach dem Konzert vielleicht von den Musikerinnen und dem Komponisten noch Näheres erfahren will, der kann dies traditionell bei Baguette und einem Gläschen Wein tun.