WELCOME

Welcome to Boulangerie 2017!
Our concert series combines concert and salon together and builds a bridge between the traditional chamber music repertoire and the music of today. Each event is dedicated to a contemporary composer who is present during the concert and talks with us about his work and life – the focus here is not musicological analysis, but a personal conversation about the music. To conclude the evening, bread and wine is offered after in a relaxed atmosphere and the audience has the opportunity to talk with us and our guest.

This year we have again great composers, who have all found a very individual and unmistakable sound language. Our first event is also a premiere for us: for the first time, we have invited two composers together: Ulrich Kreppein and Charlotte Seither have written both works for which sculptures were a source of inspiration. In June, we are very happy to welcome the celebrated Finnish composer Kaija Saariaho with her work Light and Matter in Hamburg. In Berlin, there is an event dedicated to Hans Werner Henze. As a conversation guest, we were able to win his long-term assistant Dr. Michael Kerstan.
In second half of the year – for the second time in our Boulangerie – Toshio Hosokawa from Japan is our guest.

We hope welcoming you to our next Boulangerie!

Karla, Birgit & Ilona
Boulanger Trio

UPCOMING CONCERTS

Thursday, 26 October 2017, 7 pm
Hamburg, resonanzraum St. Pauli

Boulangerie with Charlotte Bray

Ludwig van Beethoven, Trio movement in B flat major WoO 39
Charlotte Bray, Beyond for solo violin (2013)
Trio in G major op. 121a, “Kakadu Variations”
Charlotte Bray, Those Secret Eyes (2014) for violin, cello and piano
Charlotte Bray, Perseus (2015) for cello and piano
Charlotte Bray, That Crazed Smile (2014) for violin, cello and piano
Boulanger Trio
Guest: Charlotte Bray

Charlotte Bray

Sunday, 29 October 2017, 7 pm
Berlin, Radialsystem V

Boulangerie with Charlotte Bray

Ludwig van Beethoven, Trio movement in B flat major WoO 39
Charlotte Bray, Beyond for solo violin (2013)
Trio in G major op. 121a, “Kakadu Variations”
Charlotte Bray, Those Secret Eyes (2014) for violin, cello and piano
Charlotte Bray, Perseus (2015) for cello and piano
Charlotte Bray, That Crazed Smile (2014) for violin, cello and piano
Boulanger Trio
Guest: Charlotte Bray

Charlotte Bray

An outstanding talent of her generation, the composer Charlotte Bray studied under Mark Anthony Turnage and Joe Cutler. She has written for leading musicians, including Lawrence Power and Roderick Williams. Her associations include the London Symphony Orchestra, London Philharmonic Orchestra and Birmingham Contemporary Music Group and her work has featured at the BBC Proms, Aldeburgh, Tanglewood, Aix-en-Provence and Verbier. Sir Mark Elder, Oliver Knussen and Daniel Harding are among the renowned conductors who have performed her work.

2017 premieres include Voyage by The Nordic Saxophone Quartet (Torún, Poland); piano quartet Zustände by The Schubert Ensemble (Straford-on-Avon); and Blaze and Fall, a Hommage to Kurtag, by the Jacquin Trio. Also, performances of At the Speed of Stillness by the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra in the ISCM World Music Days Festival; and Black Rainbow by the DalaSinfonietta and Wermland Opera Orchestra (Falun and Karlstad, Sweden). Collaborating with the BBC Symphony Orchestra on two occasions in 2016, Stone Dancer premiered at Aldeburgh Festival under Oliver Knussen; and her cello concerto Falling in the Fire under Sakari Oramo with Guy Johnston in the BBC Proms. Exploring the work of the late Tim Hetherington, a renowned photo journalist, the latter is motivated by the composer’s endeavour to comprehend war and its impact in our world today. Other recent highlights include: Bluer than Midnight (Winsor Music, Boston); chamber opera Entanglement, in collaboration with librettist Amy Rosenthal (Cheltenham and Presteigne Festivals, Nova Music Opera); and a stage work Out of the Ruins (Royal Opera House Covent Garden).

At the Speed of Stillness, Charlotte’s debut recording on NMC Records, was released in October 2014.


Her many accolades include the Royal Philharmonic Society Composition Prize; Lili Boulanger Prize; Critics’ Circle Award; Composer-in-residence with BCMG, Oxford Lieder Festival and Hatfield House Chamber Music Festival; named in The Evening Standard’s Most Influential Londoners (2011); Honorary Member of Birmingham Conservatoire and named Alumni of the Year (2014); interviewed for Radio 3’s Composers’ Room series; residencies at the MacDowell Colony, the Liguria Study Centre and Aldeburgh Music.

more

Those Secret Eyes

Those Secret Eyes is loosely inspired by Shakespeare’s Macbeth, and principally the plays’ female characters: Lady Macbeth and the Witches. Set at night, it holds dark undercurrents of suspicion, sin, superstition, and mistrust. Governed by the principal themes of appearance and reality, and ambition and guilt, the piece is driven by a cruel, dry energy.


The scheming, tightly wound opening, strings playing single sul ponticello lines punctuated by the piano, seems as if they are conspiring together and daring each other. The plot thickens with the music becoming faster, more excitable and heavier. Even the melodic lines before the climax are unsettlingly cold and calculated. We wind up back to similar material seen at the opening, as if this short meeting has come to a close, veiled agenda set.

Beyond

Written in Berlin in the early summer of 2013 as a gift for a friend on his departure and return to his homeland of Israel. An impassioned melody flows freely and sweetly. I wanted to principally explore the dark lower register of the instrument, as well as the special sound quality found high on each string. Long questioning phrases hang in the air, yet a sense of closure is finally reached.

Perseus

Dedicated to Guy Johnston and Tom Poster


Guy Johnston commissioned this piece to commemorate the 300th anniversary of his cello, with the idea that the piece would reflect in some way the history of the instrument. The composer took the cello makers name, David Tecchler, and translated this letters into a musical language to form the backbone of the work harmonically. The harmonic structure of the first main section (after the introduction), for example, follows the letters of his name : D-A-v-i-D t-E-C-C-H(B)-l-E-r, (ignoring the small letters which don’t literally translate into notes).

The work also takes inspiration from the phenomenon known as a ‘Super Massive Black Hole’. Captivating images have recently revealed that the Black Hole in the centre of the ‘Perseus’ galaxy, a constellation in the Northern hemisphere, dominates everything around it by propelling an extraordinary amount of radiation and energy out into the surrounding gas. The strange paradox is that an explosive feeding Black Hole is the brightest source of life in the galaxy, greedy and luminous. Bray is fascinated and motivated creatively by this unseen and unknowable force. Exploring various imaginary states, this abstract source found its way into the piece.

The introduction contains three contrasting short musical kernels, each of which are explored and expanded upon in the main body of the piece. The cello line is underpinned by a low piano drone, and (in the second and third phrases), a high accented chord. This flows into a delicate section, sparsely written, as if the notes are distant stars in the galaxy far away. Growing out of this, the composer describes the section following as ‘White Heat, luminous’. An intense rhythmic and repetitive bass line thunders away, punctuated by high stabbing clusters. The sustained glowing cello line leads to fast outbursts. A high cello melody sings throughout the third section, the lyrical centre of the piece. It feels intense and gritty above the powerful chordal piano accompaniment. The forth and final section is deeply calm, a slow reflective end to the piece.

TICKETS HAMBURG
TICKETS BERLIN

Tuesday, 5 December 2017, 7 pm
Hamburg, resonanzraum St. Pauli

Boulangerie with Toshio Hosokawa

Toshio Hosokawa, Small Chant (2012) for cello
Camille Saint-Saëns, Trio in e minor op. 92
Toshio Hosokawa, Klavier-Trio (2013)
Boulanger Trio
Guest: Toshio Hosokawa

Toshio Hosokawa

Wednesday, 6 December 2017, 7 pm
Berlin, Radialsystem V

Boulangerie with Toshio Hosokawa

Toshio Hosokawa, Small Chant (2012) for cello
Camille Saint-Saëns, Trio in e minor op. 92
Toshio Hosokawa, Klavier-Trio (2013)
Boulanger Trio
Guest: Toshio Hosokawa

TICKETS HAMBURG
TICKETS BERLIN

Sunday, 13 May 2018, 5 pm
Fulda

Boulangerie with Pēteris Vasks

Pēteris Vasks, Episodi e canto perpetuo
Olivier Messiaen, Quatuor pour la fin du temps
Boulanger Trio
Guests: Pēteris Vasks, Sebastian Manz (clarinet)


hosted by the city of Fulda

Peteris Vasks

Friday, 8 Juni 2018, 8 pm
Donaueschingen

Boulangerie with David Philip Hefti

Franz Schubert, Adagio in E-flat major „Notturno“
David Philip Hefti, Lichter Hall (2012)
David Philip Hefti, Poème noctambule (2016)
Arnold Schönberg, Verklärte Nacht op.4 (Arr. Eduard Steuermann)
Guest: David Philip Hefti

hefti_q

We thank our sponsors:

Kulturbehoerde
logo_Rusch Stiftung
logo_rudolf-augstein
Vereinslogo 250x50

Hamburger Abendblatt, 11/2016

Boulanger Trio: Bei Wein und Käse Musik entdecken

Ein Artikel von Verena Fischer-Zernin

Hamburg. Liefe die Veranstaltung im Fernsehen, dann hieße sie womöglich “Das kompositorische Quartett”: Drei Musikerinnen sitzen mit einem Gast in einer Runde und unterhalten sich mit ihm eloquent und charmant über ihn und sein Werk. Zwischendurch spielen sie.

Dies ist aber keine neue Talkshow. Dies ist die “Boulangerie”, wie die drei Damen vom Boulanger Trio ihren Salon nennen. Die Werkauswahl trifft der eingeladene Komponist, es erklingen jeweils Werke aus seiner Feder und solche aus dem angestammten Repertoire für Klaviertrio. Am Schluss bitten die Künstlerinnen die Anwesenden zu Wein und Käse.

“Unser Konzept ist, dass die Leute mit uns den Komponisten kennenlernen, den Menschen, der hinter der Musik steht. Der interessiert uns ja genauso”, sagt die Geigerin des Trios, Birgit Erz, über die “Boulangerie”. “Wenn man den Menschen kennt, ist die Bereitschaft, sich auf Neues einzulassen, viel größer.”

Erz und ihre Mitstreiterinnen Karla Haltenwanger (Klavier) und Ilona Kindt (Cello), jede für sich eine ausgezeichnete Interpretin, haben einzeln und gemeinsam zahlreiche Preise nach Hause getragen – wo übrigens auf jede von ihnen zwei Kinder warten; gute Organisation und ein belastbares Netzwerk brauche es schon, sagt Erz. Zu hören ist es bei ihren Konzerten nie, wie anstrengend der Spagat zwischen Kunst und Familie sein kann. Wolfgang Rihm (das ist der, der zur Eröffnung der Elbphilharmonie das Auftragswerk “Reminiszenz” beisteuert) bedankte sich nach einem Konzert: “So interpretiert zu werden ist wohl für jeden Komponisten ein Wunschtraum.” Und ein begeisterter Kritiker hat die drei gar schon als Erbinnen des weltberühmten Beaux Arts Trios ausgerufen.

Anders als beim Beaux Arts Trio gehört für sie allerdings die Beschäftigung mit Neuer Musik zum Kern ihres künstlerischen Profils. Mit dem Ensemblenamen ehren die Musikerinnen die französischen Schwestern Nadia und Lili Boulanger. Beide waren Komponistinnen. Lili starb schon 1918 mit 24 Jahren und hinterließ ein schmales, aber wegweisendes Œuvre. Nadia wiederum hat die zeitgenössische Musik bis zu ihrem Tod 1979 über Jahrzehnte mitgeprägt, zu ihren Schülern gehörten Astor Piazzolla, Philip Glass und auch Daniel Barenboim. Jeden Mittwoch gab sie Theoriestunden in ihrer Pariser Wohnung. Da kamen nicht nur ihre Studenten, sondern auch andere Künstler, und hinterher gab es Tee und Gebäck. Die Studenten nannten diese Institution so liebevoll wie beziehungsreich “Boulangerie” (das französische Wort für “Bäckerei”).

Den Rang des Boulanger Trios zeigt auch die Riege bedeutender Komponisten, die die Einladung zur “Boulangerie” angenommen haben. Toshio Hosokawa war da, ein führender Vertreter der zeitgenössischen japanischen Musik, dessen Oper “Stilles Meer” Anfang des Jahres an der Staatsoper uraufgeführt wurde. Der Doyen der Neuen Musik in Österreich, Friedrich Cerha, hat mit ihnen vor Publikum geplaudert, und im Juni kommt die gefeierte Finnin Kaija Saariaho.

Seit 2012 leisten die drei sich die “Boulangerie” in Hamburg und im Berliner Radialsystem. Inzwischen haben sie die Reihe, dank der Hilfe der Alban Berg Stiftung, sogar in den Wiener Musikverein exportieren können. Und seit die drei von der etwas abseits gelegenen Kulturfabrik Kampnagel in den Resonanzraum umgezogen sind, entwickeln sich die Besucherzahlen prächtig.

“Der Raum ist perfekt für uns, auch mit der Bar”, sagt Birgit Erz. “Der klingt toll, ist sehr flexibel und hat eine tolle Atmosphäre.” Über einen Umzug in die Elbphilharmonie nachzudenken sieht sie zurzeit keinen Grund. “Wir wollen ja mit dem Publikum gemeinsam etwas entdecken. Für uns funktioniert das besser in einer intimen Atmosphäre”, sagt Erz. “Da kommen Leute, die noch nie mit Neuer Musik in Berührung waren, und die finden das alle spannend.” Man findet aber auch nicht jeden Tag ein Ensemble dieses Niveaus, das dem Publikum Neue Musik so unangestrengt wie kenntnisreich nahebringt und es teilhaben lässt an dem knisternd intensiven Kontakt, der beim Musizieren entsteht.

Kammer-Musik eben. Selten wird das Wesen des Genres so fassbar.